Where GREP Came From - Computerphile - - vimore.org

Where GREP Came From - Computerphile

Where GREP Came From - Computerphile

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Commonly used grep was written overnight, but why and how did it get its name? Professor Brian Kernighan explains. EXTRA BITS: https://youtu.be/bSaBe6WiC2s Inside an ALT Coin Mining Operation: COMING SOON Unix Pipeline: https://youtu.be/bKzonnwoR2I https://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: https://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com



"C" Programming Language: Brian Kernighan - Computerphile

"C" is one of the most widely used programming languages of all time. Prof Brian Kernighan wrote the book on "C", well, co-wrote it - on a visit to the Universi

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Onion Routing - Computerphile

What goes on TOR stays on TOR, or so we hope. Dr Mike Pound takes us through how Onion Routing works. EXTRA BITS: https://youtu.be/6eWkdyRNfqY End to End Encr

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Programming Loops vs Recursion - Computerphile

Programming loops are great, but there's a point where they aren't enough. Professor Brailsford explains. EXTRA BITS: https://youtu.be/DVG5G1V8Zx0 The Most Di

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Ordered Dithering - Computerphile

How do we represent multiple greys with simple black or white pixels? Dr Bagley joins the dots! Error Diffusion Dithering: COMING SOON How JPEG Works: https://

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Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem - Numberphile

Marcus du Sautoy discusses Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Extra Footage Part One: https://youtu.be/mccoBBf0VDM

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Will Graphene Replace Silicon? - Computerphile

Why has it gone quiet on graphene? We asked Sixty Symbols' Professor Laurence Eaves, who was part of the team who built the first graphene transistor. Fine St

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Prime Spirals - Numberphile

Prime numbers, Ulam Spirals and other cool numbery stuff with Dr James Grime. More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ James Clewett on spirals at: htt

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Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) & Douglas Adams' 42 - Computerphile

Just how do you go from a binary number to a printed out numeric character? Professor Brailsford takes us through Binary Coded Decimal IBM, EBCDIC & a Meg-in-a

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21-card trick - Numberphile

A simple trick with some neat math behind it. More on Numberphile cards at: http://www.bradyharanblog.com/numberphile-playing-cards More links & stuff in full d

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Resizing Images - Computerphile

Nearest Neighbour and BiLinear resize explained by Dr Mike Pound Fire Pong: https://youtu.be/T6EBe_5LxO8 Google Deep Dream: https://youtu.be/BsSmBPmPeYQ FPS &

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Essentials: Brian Kernighan on Associative Arrays - Computerphile

The 'Swiss Army Knife' of data structures, Professor Brian Kernighan talks about the associative array with beer & pizza. EXTRA BITS: https://youtu.be/H8k-I4A

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Infinity is bigger than you think - Numberphile

Sometimes infinity is even bigger than you think... Dr James Grime explains with a little help from Georg Cantor. More links & stuff in full description below ↓

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Computing Limit - Computerphile

Just how far can we go with processing speed? Physicist Professor Phil Moriarty talks about the hard limits of computing. Technical physics (aside) video: http

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The Slightly Spooky Recamán Sequence - Numberphile

Check out Brilliant (and get 20% off their premium service): https://brilliant.org/numberphile (sponsor)... More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Ch

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Just How do Macs and PCs Differ? - Computerphile

Following on from our contentious 'Mac or PC' film, we asked Professor Tom Rodden just what the actual difference is between Mac and PC. (by PC we are referring

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How Secure Shell Works (SSH) - Computerphile

Connecting via SSH to a remote machine is second nature to some, but how does it work? Dr Steve Bagley. Dr Mike Pound on Hashing (mentions padding but full vid

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The Most Difficult Program to Compute? - Computerphile

The story of recursion continues as Professor Brailsford explains one of the most difficult programs to compute: Ackermann's function. Professor Brailsford's p

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Punch Card Programming - Computerphile

How did punch card systems work? Professor Brailsford delves further into the era of mainframe computing with this hands-on look at punch cards. Extra Material

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Functional Programming & Haskell - Computerphile

Just what is functional programming? We asked a member of the team that created Haskell: John Hughes, Professor of Computer Science at Chalmers University of Te

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Man in the Middle Attacks & Superfish - Computerphile

Lenovo sold thousands of computers all carrying the Superfish software. Tom Scott explains what a security nightmare this became. More Tom Scott: http://www.y

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